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All of the Pilot "Wasp" and "Super-Wasp" receivers found today will vary greatly in the quality of workmanship.Since these receivers were kits, the assembler may have had little or no experience in soldering, wiring or mechanical building.Some of the famous employees of Pilot were Robert Kruse, Alfred Ghirardi and John Geloso.David Grimes was a Contributing Editor for "Radio Design" - Pilot's magazine.The "Wasp" was designed by Robert Kruse and Milton B. The plug-in coils selected the tuning ranges that covered 500 meters to 17 meters or about 600kc up to 17.6mc.

Pilot's magazine "Radio Design" was always including updates along with suggestions for improving performance, consequently "Super-Wasp" receivers are sometimes found today having modifications or non-original parts.The stock circuit used a type 22 screen-grid tube as an RF amplifier, a 201-A as a regenerative detector and a 201-A tube as the first AF amplifier and a UX-112A as the second AF amplifier.The user could substitute a 201A for the last audio stage and reduce the plate voltage and bias voltage if a UX-112A was not available.Though Pilot's advertising claimed they had been in business since 1908 and the company had used several different names during that time, "Pilot Electric Manufacturing Company" was officially founded in 1922 by Isidor Goldberg in Brooklyn, New York.Pilot Electric Manufacturing Company also claimed to be "The World's Largest Radio Parts Plant" in the twenties and they did build all of the parts supplied with their kits.

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Pilot also stipulated that only their own Pilotron tubes would perform correctly in the A. "Super-Wasp." Pilot plug-in coils are used for five tuning ranges covering 600kc up to 21.5mc.

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